Watercolor Journaling/Mixed Media Course

In my previous post, I described the first watercolor course that Jane LaFazio offered this summer.  Jane is also a quilt artist. She incorporates various mediums to create her work. I love her versatility and enjoy seeing what creative hat she has on from day to day. Following her blog is highly informative and inspirational.

The second course she offered this summer continued the journaling techniques. This course added mixed media. This was very appealing to me. I enjoyed it immensely.

Watercolor is challenging, you can’t control it and you shouldn’t try.

That is my theory. It takes a lot of restraint to NOT try to take control. The medium must flow and create nuances that are unpredictable. This is always a gamble.

Jane offers a relaxed casual approach to painting with watercolor. First, the act of journaling is meant to be quick and not labored. Do a quick sketch, refine it, add some watercolor, add some text, add various elements to bring it together like stamps.

Jane’s use of watercolor borders on illustration and graphic art. She defines the drawings with permanent black ink before painting. This was something new for me. It took some getting used to. Jane also believes in setting up a pane or field around the composition. This is a defined area outlined in ink that links the elements and adds a nice quality.

In the mixed media course she includes a method using tissue paper. Drawings are traced onto the paper and then adhered over an area of the watercolor paper. She introduced new art tools like the TomBow pen. This pen is felt tipped and water soluble.

lesson 2 resized

In this composition I broke the 9×12″ page into sections by drawing several different size and shape frames. The center tray with stones is overlapped by the candle stick and the tray overlaps one of the frames. This creates depth. The pen was fun to use.

 tombo pen_section

This close up shows the stippling I did. The candle stick was aged and had a crunchy texture on the finish. The stippling described this texture well. Then I used the stippling again for the shadow on the tray. The pens come in various colors. I used gray and black.

 One of the lesson’s was to draw one subject nine ways. Varying the scale, the tool, the method.

 

lesson 4 part 1 2nd page resizedlesson 5 page 2 resized

 

 

 

 

 

 

The image on the left shows the first sections. I numbered each one in text. 1. The top left section has a succulent plant defined with ink and no watercolor. 2. The Bottom left section has a hydrangea blossom drawn in pencil, no ink outline and painted with watercolor. 3.The large flower in the center is several branches and blossoms of the hydrangea plant.

In the right image the page is developed further. 4. Top center is an ink drawing of a small cone flower, watercolor background. 5. Top right has another larger cone flower drawn with water soluble pencil. 6. Is mid-left, Tombow pen drawing of a succulent, watercolor background. 7. Top right corner has another hydrangea blossom drawn with ink and painted with watercolor with a book page as background that is also painted with watercolor. 8. Is another succulent plant drawn with ink with faded text from a book page tinted with pale turquoise watercolor. 9. is a very small cone flower located between 2 and 4. which was first traced onto tissue paper and then applied to the watercolor paper with gel medium, then painted with watercolor.

Jane offers art walk tours in Europe. This summer she conducted one in Italy. Next summer she is conducting one in France on the Riviera. As it turns out, my husband and I had planned to be in that region at the same time for our 40th wedding anniversary. So, we will be joining Jane in Nice for a week. She has things planned for husbands too.

I encourage you to check out what she is up to.

http://janelafazio.com