Silk Prints with Textile Paints

Printed Silk #1

Printed Silk #1

I had a play day recently. A very good friend of mine paid me a visit. We have very similar interests in textile art. She had taken a five day workshop and learned how to apply interesting designs with procion dyes and various tools and applications. She invited me to take out some fabrics and play! I used textile paints instead of dye. The results were fast, fun and turned out fabulous!

 

The application is very basic:

  1. Spread the paint onto a smooth surface; I used a sheet of plexiglass.
  2. Use tools to scratch and draw designs into the paint. I used soft plastic texture tools.
  3. Place the fabric face down onto the surface.
  4. Gently press the fabric with a sponge roller.

Tips:

The consistency of the paint is important. The paint will soak through the fabric and show through to the back. The weight of the fabric is relevant. If it is thin the paint will soak up fast and the opposite if it is heavier. This is an experimental activity. I did spray some water on the back of one of the pieces of cotton as the fabric was lying on the plexiglass to encourage the paint to attach. This made a blurry effect, which I like too. I was able to get two prints with thin Habotai silk.

 

White cotton fabric

White cotton fabric

I decided to stick with black paint.

I used plain white cotton to begin with. This example is actually 3 pieces of printed fabric that I have pinned together. About 24″ x 12″.

 

 

 

Eco dyed silk

Eco dyed silk

I switched to eco dyed silk. I had several beautiful eco dyed pieces that I loved but I knew they needed to develop further. Wow! This fabric performed the best of all. It is very old Japanese silk that I eco dyed last year. This picture is of 3 printed pieces that are pinned together for consideration.

I think the best way to go forward with this one is to machine quilt it with black thread so that the lines are not noticeable. I think it will be stunning!

Eco dyed silk #2

Eco dyed silk #2

This combination is two pieces of eco dyed silk. The top piece has been printed and is lying on top of another (un-printed) eco dyed piece. The top fabric has some beautiful subtle greens.

 

 

Eco dyed silk #3 is the flip side of the previous eco dyed silk #2.  It is lying on the same solid eco dyed piece for constrast, comparison and consideration.

Eco dyed silk #3

Eco dyed silk #3

So now I am staring at this wonderful new fabric from my paint easel as I am still painting on canvases. Read my previous blog post for details about that new adventure.

So, what do you think? Would you try this? It’s so easy! Let me know if you do. I would like to see pictures too.

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